Authors


This past week Minotaur published Every Broken Trust, the latest book from my Sisters In Crime pal, Linda Rodriguez.  Last night the Mysteryscape bookstore in Overland Park, Kansas, hosted Linda’s launch party.  I arrived late, but Linda was still on hand to sign a book for me.

Linda Rodriguez signing my copy of her newest book, Every Broken Trust

Linda Rodriguez signing my copy of her newest book, Every Broken Trust

I haven’t yet read the book, having bought it only last night, but I believe one of Linda’s favorite reviews of the book is at the blog, Criminal Element, and she offers the first chapter of the book at her own blog, Linda Rodriguez Writes.

My husband and I met when we were both stationed at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.  I did not make the military a career, but he did.  This evening, we met with old friends, my husband’s former co-workers, and friends-of-friends at the USAREUR G-2 reunion banquet.

The talk ranged from kids to grandkids, to who we knew in common, to where we’ve traveled and where we ought to travel, to our European adventures, and inevitably to terrorists.

The terrorist angle was underlined by a twenty-minute talk given by Major General (retired) James Dozier who was kidnapped in 1981 by the Italian terrorist group, the Red Brigades, and was held captive for six weeks in a tent erected inside an apartment in Padua, Italy.

The majority of American personnel apparently weren’t terrorist targets as it was high-profile people whom the terrorists seemed to prefer.  Still, while living in Munich, it was unsettling to know that just across the Alps, terrorists had kidnapped an American soldier.  At the time we couldn’t know that General Dozier would be rescued as both the Baader-Meinhof group in Germany and the Red Brigades in Italy had murdered kidnapped victims (Google Jurgen Ponto and Aldo Moro).  That General Dozier is able to give talks such as this was not inevitable — the guard on duty at the time had been given a gun with which to shoot the general in the event of a rescue attempt, but did not use it because he said he couldn’t shoot a sleeping man.  Stockholm Syndrome on the part of kidnappers isn’t always a bad thing.

Finally, thanks go to the author of Secrets of the Cold War, for organizing the reunion.

For Cold War veterans who were assigned to Germany, take a trip down memory lane with Mr. McCaslin’s book.  Thanks for the autograph, Lee.

In other news, I am presently enjoying Donna Leon’s latest book Beastly Things.

Norway Has Noir; Just Ask Jo Nesbo,  by CHARLES McGRATH,  June 15, 2012

“At first I was pretty sure [detective Harry Hole] didn’t have anything to do with me, but then I realized that wasn’t true. All writers write about themselves — that’s inevitable. You put in your basic values, your views on politics and popular culture, the way you think about other people. It’s really hard to have a main character with whom you don’t share these things. But then there are things we don’t share at all. He has an addictive personality, and I guess I can relate to that, but I’m not an alcoholic.” He smiled. “And for some reason he’s not a big fan of my band.”

While looking for something about which I’ve completely forgotten, I clicked over to the Malice Domestic website and saw that the featured guests have already been added for next year’s convention.

[please insert squeal]   [and insert the erasure from my mind whatever I was looking for when I clicked]

Peter Robinson!!

Elizabeth Peters this year and Peter Robinson next year?  I may just lie down and be happy ’til then.

I often moan about no longer living in Europe, which was home for 20 of my adult years, but being able to attend Malice without flying in a plane almost makes up for the homesickness.

Rhys Bowen, author of the books about Lady Georgiana Rannoch and Molly Murphy, poses a question about the entitlement felt by readers because of authors who give away full-length books online.

Giving it away, Rhys’s Pieces

A secondary concern is the amount of “rubbish” available, but the main concern is the expectation from readers that writers will work for free.

In this morning’s newspaper, I read that Dorothy Gilman, the author of the Mrs. Pollifax spy stories, died last week.  So sorry to read that.

Dorothy Gilman, ‘Mrs. Pollifax’ Novelist, Dies at 88

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