Sleuths


When I’m writing a story, sometimes I get stuck. I’ll forget where my characters are in relation to each other. I’ll forget the exact sequence of events. I’ll forget where the characters are standing. I’ll forget how many people are even in a room.

When I have these lapses, I’m almost cheerful because that’s when I can legitimately play with some toys I (said I) bought for the grandkids — Playmobil playsets.

The two men on the (invisible) motorcycle are about to throw a Molotov cocktail at the car. My heroine, the woman on the balcony, will roust a colleague and they'll be finding fire extinguishers to put out the fire before the car can go up in flames.

The two men on the (invisible) motorcycle are about to throw a Molotov cocktail at the car. My heroine, the woman on the balcony, will roust a colleague and they’ll be finding fire extinguishers to put out the fire before the car can go up in flames.

 

I first found Playmobil toys in 1976 after we moved to Germany for the second time.  My husband and I gave our son two sets of them for Christmas.  In the years since then, the company has expanded their range of playsets so that people like me can now use them in ways the designers probably didn’t imagine. At the moment, I have a motorcycle policeman on order. In future, my characters won’t be riding invisible motorcycles.

I’m happy to say that when my little characters aren’t busy getting up to no good in my imaginary worlds, they’re happily inhabiting the more innocent stories of little children.

So, I’m sitting here, allegedly multitasking by checking a Sisters In Crime email list, emailing a thank-you, cribbing information on formatting ebooks, and watching the movie Scoop on Netflix.  I’ve read that multitasking doesn’t actually work, but it seems that I’m doing it anyhow.

While I’m multitasking, a little voice in the back of my head keeps telling me I’m missing something. It’s a nagging little feeling, nothing momentous (thank goodness), but just something.

Through my haze of reading, typing, muting the story when suspenseful things are happening (I’m fine with mysteries, but I don’t [gracefully] do suspense), I think, “Lovejoy.”  It finally dawns on me that one of the primary characters in the movie is Ian McShane, an actor I haven’t seen onscreen in years. That little voice isn’t in the back of my head, it’s coming from the television.

Now I’m going to have to waste time looking on Netflix for Lovejoy. I don’t have much hope, but you never know.  In the meantime, back to Scoop.

On the Sisters in Crime email list for “the great unpublished” (Guppies), one of the discussions was how a member discovered Donna Leon’s Inspector Brunetti series that is set in Venice, Italy. I’m a Brunetti fan and I was pleased to see recommendations for books by authors who set their stories in Italy.

The pièce de résistance of the discussion (as far as I was concerned) was the revelation that an Inspector Brunetti television series is available, in German!  (pardon my squeal of excitement)  I now have a list for people-who-give-me-gifts, and am thinking up nine gift-giving days, such as Mother’s Day, my birthday, our anniversary, and Christmas.  I suppose we could add St. Patrick’s Day, the first day of spring, May Day, Hallowe’en and Flag Day.  That makes nine, right?

Again, thanks to the Guppy list and the generous members.

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Update

The first two-program Brunetti video set arrived yesterday and I watched the first program, “Vendetta.”  I (along with my three-week old granddaughter) enjoyed the show.  The scenes of Venice were delightful; the characters, although not identical to what I imagined while reading the books, are well-cast; hearing German took me back to Europe; the story was well-produced.  The subtitled were useful for scenes in which the German words weren’t clear, or for dialogue in which I just didn’t know the words. My baby was lulled throughout.

All in all, a success.  I look forward to (eventually) seeing the entire series.

On Netflix, I have just discovered Phryne Fisher.

The first two episodes of the series (all that I’ve seen, at the moment) are of excellent quality, capturing the elegance of the 1920s. I also find the characters to be engaging.  I’m hoping that the books are as evocative.